Spring is blooming


By Lorna Hart - Special to OVP



Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculate)and Creeping Phlox (Phlox subulate) are easy to grow perennials. Their bright colors and fragrance attract a variety of pollinators.

Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculate)and Creeping Phlox (Phlox subulate) are easy to grow perennials. Their bright colors and fragrance attract a variety of pollinators.


Kimberly Wolfe | Courtesy

Grape hyacinths (Muscari) are not directly related to true hyacinths, but bloom around the same time and require the same care, so are usually included in information about true Hyacinths.


Lorna Hart | Courtesy

The fragrance of Hyacinths (Hyacinthus) is so intoxicating that they are often called “nature’s perfume.” The original flower was pale blue or violet, but they now come in a variety of colors.


Kimberly Wolfe | Courtesy

Lilly of the Valley is a woodland flowering plant native to the Northern Hemisphere in Asia and Europe. Although cherished for it light sent and delicate white flowers, it can become invasive.


Kimberly Wolfe | Courtesy

Crabapple trees, tired of waiting for winter to end, have burst on the scene in colors of pink and white. These trees are ornamental and do not bear fruit.


Danna Kessinger | Courtesy

Depending on your view of violets, they are either weeds, or a cherished part of a spring flower garden.


Lorna Hart | Courtesy

Tulips (Tulipa) originated in Central Asia, but are usually associated with Holland. There is some disagreement as to who brought the first tulip to the Netherlands, but it was sometime in the 16th Century. So popular and rare, they were sometimes used as currency, and the theft of bulbs was a problem for growers.


Lorna Hart | Courtesy

Bridal wreath spirea (Spiraea aprunifolia) is an heirloom shrub that is easy to care for and can be pruned as a bush, or if left to its natural growth, will cascade with branches of clustered white blossoms. While we do not know for sure where the name originated, it seems to be associated with spring weddings.


Lorna Hart | Courtesy

OHIO VALLEY — If daffodils are the beautiful harbingers of Spring, then those flowers and trees that follow are the encore. Just as the daffodils are taking a final bow, a variety of other bulbed flowers emerge from their slumber, as well as flowering trees and bushes.

Suddenly, color is everywhere. Mixed with the yellows are purple, pink, red and purple white — Spring has surely arrived.

Every flower has its own origin story; they have journeyed from all parts of the Northern Hemisphere, and been propagated and bred to be heartier and more colorful than their ancestors.

They bring joy after cold and bleak winters, they surprise us with their heartiness, diversity, and beauty, and they thrive in the soil and climate of the Ohio Valley. While they quickly fade as the temperature rises, they are a reminder that many things in nature are fleeting, and we should take a moment to enjoy their displays of color before they are gone.

© 2022 Ohio Valley Publishing, all rights reserved.

Garden Phlox (Phlox paniculate)and Creeping Phlox (Phlox subulate) are easy to grow perennials. Their bright colors and fragrance attract a variety of pollinators.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_Flox-Kim-Wolfe-1.jpgGarden Phlox (Phlox paniculate)and Creeping Phlox (Phlox subulate) are easy to grow perennials. Their bright colors and fragrance attract a variety of pollinators. Kimberly Wolfe | Courtesy

Grape hyacinths (Muscari) are not directly related to true hyacinths, but bloom around the same time and require the same care, so are usually included in information about true Hyacinths.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_thumbnail_Grape-Hyacinths-Hart-1.jpgGrape hyacinths (Muscari) are not directly related to true hyacinths, but bloom around the same time and require the same care, so are usually included in information about true Hyacinths. Lorna Hart | Courtesy

The fragrance of Hyacinths (Hyacinthus) is so intoxicating that they are often called “nature’s perfume.” The original flower was pale blue or violet, but they now come in a variety of colors.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_thumbnail_Hyacinths-Kim-Wolfe-1.jpgThe fragrance of Hyacinths (Hyacinthus) is so intoxicating that they are often called “nature’s perfume.” The original flower was pale blue or violet, but they now come in a variety of colors. Kimberly Wolfe | Courtesy

Lilly of the Valley is a woodland flowering plant native to the Northern Hemisphere in Asia and Europe. Although cherished for it light sent and delicate white flowers, it can become invasive.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_thumbnail_Lilly-of-the-Valley-Kim-Wolfe-1.jpgLilly of the Valley is a woodland flowering plant native to the Northern Hemisphere in Asia and Europe. Although cherished for it light sent and delicate white flowers, it can become invasive. Kimberly Wolfe | Courtesy

Crabapple trees, tired of waiting for winter to end, have burst on the scene in colors of pink and white. These trees are ornamental and do not bear fruit.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_thumbnail_Pink-Flowering-Crabapple-Dana-Kessinger-1.jpgCrabapple trees, tired of waiting for winter to end, have burst on the scene in colors of pink and white. These trees are ornamental and do not bear fruit. Danna Kessinger | Courtesy

Depending on your view of violets, they are either weeds, or a cherished part of a spring flower garden.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_thumbnail_Vioilets-Lorna-Hart-1.jpgDepending on your view of violets, they are either weeds, or a cherished part of a spring flower garden. Lorna Hart | Courtesy

Tulips (Tulipa) originated in Central Asia, but are usually associated with Holland. There is some disagreement as to who brought the first tulip to the Netherlands, but it was sometime in the 16th Century. So popular and rare, they were sometimes used as currency, and the theft of bulbs was a problem for growers.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_thumbnail_Yellow-Tulip-Lorna-Hart-1.jpgTulips (Tulipa) originated in Central Asia, but are usually associated with Holland. There is some disagreement as to who brought the first tulip to the Netherlands, but it was sometime in the 16th Century. So popular and rare, they were sometimes used as currency, and the theft of bulbs was a problem for growers. Lorna Hart | Courtesy

Bridal wreath spirea (Spiraea aprunifolia) is an heirloom shrub that is easy to care for and can be pruned as a bush, or if left to its natural growth, will cascade with branches of clustered white blossoms. While we do not know for sure where the name originated, it seems to be associated with spring weddings.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/04/web1_thumbnail_Bridal-Wreath-Lorna-Hart-1.jpgBridal wreath spirea (Spiraea aprunifolia) is an heirloom shrub that is easy to care for and can be pruned as a bush, or if left to its natural growth, will cascade with branches of clustered white blossoms. While we do not know for sure where the name originated, it seems to be associated with spring weddings. Lorna Hart | Courtesy

By Lorna Hart

Special to OVP

Lorna Hart is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing.

Lorna Hart is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing.