The fellowship of FFA


Week of activities planned

By Brittany Hively - [email protected]



FFA members have attended several community meetings in February to spread awareness on FFA.

FFA members have attended several community meetings in February to spread awareness on FFA.


State FFA member Kaitlyn Luikart, spent the day with agriculture and FFA students, leading them in a number of teamwork building activities.


Brittany Hively | OVP

Agriculture students had to use communication skills to flip the tarp with everyone standing on it.


Brittany Hively | OVP

Students had to build a “human machine” during one of the teamwork activities. This group of students chose to make a popcorn machine.


Brittany Hively | OVP

Students had to build a “human machine” during one of the teamwork activities. This group of students chose to make a deer processing machine.


Brittany Hively | OVP

POINT PLEASANT — Students involved with the Mason County Career Center’s (MCCC) Future Farmer’s of America (FFA) program are gearing up for National FFA week which is Feb. 19-26 and includes activities and educating the community on what all the program entails.

“We’re growing the next generation of leaders who will change the world,” the FFA website says. “FFA is the premier youth organization preparing members for leadership and careers in the science, business and technology of agriculture.”

The FFA programs welcomes students from all areas of study and encourages anyone interested to join.

Students from the MCCC chapter had various reasons for joining.

“I decided to join FFA because it’s not just about farming and animals,” said Havin Roush, junior. “It’s also about leadership and helping the community and about learning how to communicate with other people. And I was not very good at talking in front of people, talking to people or being a leader. So, this has really helped develop my speaking skills and how to talk to other people.”

Some joined for family tradition.

“I joined FFA because it’s been like passed on in my family,” said Brooke Warner, senior. “I really enjoyed doing that. I joined because a bunch of my friends were in it too and I didn’t know exactly what it was about, so I joined to kind of learn the experience.”

Being a part of the FFA has taught students more than they expected.

“I learned it’s not about animals,” said Warner. “That’s the big thing. It’s actually about a lot of different things and leadership skills. I do a lot of community service, a lot of different activities that don’t just involve your animals, but also animals are a big part.”

It is about experience for some students.

“You also make a lot of new friends,” Roush said. “We meet so many people from so many different places. We learn real life experiences and how to do things in the real world from our skills in FFA. They [will] help us later in life.”

And for some it is opportunity.

“There’s a bunch of different opportunities brought through FFA, as a bunch of different career paths and stuff that you can take,” said Caleb Pierson, sophomore. “The ag industry is a wide range of stuff. There’s just so many different paths you can take.”

Students encourage those unsure about the program to give it a try.

“If it’s something you’re not sure about, just come and try it out,” Roush said. “And [most of] those people find that they like it and they get really involved.”

Roush said she has had a number of opportunities and experiences through FFA including competitions, travel and showing animals.

Amy Miller, agriculture teacher, encourages everyone interested to join the program.

“It’s not just farming and you don’t have to have any associations or ties with a farm,” Miller said. “We have members who live right here in the middle of town and they are just as active as our members who don’t. And there are opportunities for everyone regardless of your background.”

Students said there has been a stigma that FFA is just farmers and farming and that there is a stigma on students attending MCCC.

“People think that, this is also the Career Center too, there’s a big stigma,” Roush said. “If you don’t want to go to college, if you’re not smart enough for college, if you’re not smart, if you’re a troublemaker — you’re down here, you’re in programs like FFA or welding and stuff like that. That’s not what it’s about. Last year, we had, she [was the] valedictorian. We had some of the top of the class in our organization.”

The FFA students said the valedictorian, Hannah Wood, went on to win national FFA awards and receive a full-ride to Ohio State where she is studying to be a veterinarian.

The students said they keep up with several graduated members who currently attend Ohio State, West Virginia University and Marshal University.

The MCCC chapter of FFA currently has 55 members and another four members who have graduated, Miller said. She said students can be a member of FFA for three years post-graduation and can go on to the collegiate level.

To help spread the word about what all FFA entails, students have been going to meetings, such as the county commission and board of education, to speak about the organization.

A community FFA kickoff will be Saturday, Feb. 19 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. behind the MCCC. All community members are invited.

FFA students said there will be music, food, games and the opportunity to not only meet members, but learn more about the program.

During National FFA Week, the local chapter is hosting a related dress-up week for the school. The week includes “Get up and feed day,” “Camo and orange — hunter’s breakfast day,” “America Day,” “FFA Day” (blue and gold), and “flannel day.”

The students will also participate with other local chapters in the annual FFA church service and dinner on Sunday, Feb. 20.

State Officer Kaitlyn Luikart spent Friday with the agriculture classes and FFA students, working on teamwork activities with each class.

Luikart spoke about the importance of communication in teamwork and challenged the students in a various activities that involved them communicating.

The MCCC FFA program is advised by Miller and Sam Nibert, agriculture teacher and open to all interested students.

© 2022, Ohio Valley Publishing, all rights reserved.

FFA members have attended several community meetings in February to spread awareness on FFA.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/02/web1_IMG_4990.jpgFFA members have attended several community meetings in February to spread awareness on FFA.

State FFA member Kaitlyn Luikart, spent the day with agriculture and FFA students, leading them in a number of teamwork building activities.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/02/web1_IMG_5267.jpgState FFA member Kaitlyn Luikart, spent the day with agriculture and FFA students, leading them in a number of teamwork building activities. Brittany Hively | OVP

Agriculture students had to use communication skills to flip the tarp with everyone standing on it.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/02/web1_IMG_5281.jpgAgriculture students had to use communication skills to flip the tarp with everyone standing on it. Brittany Hively | OVP

Students had to build a “human machine” during one of the teamwork activities. This group of students chose to make a popcorn machine.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/02/web1_IMG_5293.jpgStudents had to build a “human machine” during one of the teamwork activities. This group of students chose to make a popcorn machine. Brittany Hively | OVP

Students had to build a “human machine” during one of the teamwork activities. This group of students chose to make a deer processing machine.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2022/02/web1_IMG_5308.jpgStudents had to build a “human machine” during one of the teamwork activities. This group of students chose to make a deer processing machine. Brittany Hively | OVP
Week of activities planned

By Brittany Hively

[email protected]

Brittany Hively is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing. Follow her on Twitter @britthively; reach her at (740) 446-2342 ext 2555.

Brittany Hively is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing. Follow her on Twitter @britthively; reach her at (740) 446-2342 ext 2555.