This Week in West Virginia History


Pictured is a past reenactment of the Siege of Fort Randolph. Volunteers will offer a “History Walk” event today, May 15. The fort will be open from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. for visitors to tour the grounds with their family or small social groups.

Pictured is a past reenactment of the Siege of Fort Randolph. Volunteers will offer a “History Walk” event today, May 15. The fort will be open from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. for visitors to tour the grounds with their family or small social groups.


OVP File Photo

The following events happened on these dates in West Virginia history. To read more, go to e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia at www.wvencyclopedia.org.

May 16, 1778: About 300 Wyandot and Mingo Indians attacked Fort Randolph at Point Pleasant. Unable to take the fort, the Indians proceeded up the Kanawha River toward other settlements.

May 17, 1854: A violent windstorm swept up the Ohio River and severely damaged the Wheeling Suspension Bridge.

May 17, 1862: The Battle of Pigeon Roost took place in Princeton during the Civil War. Union soldiers were noisily approaching Princeton from the southeast, unaware that the Confederates were lying in ambush. The attack left an estimated 18 federal troops killed and 38 wounded.

May 18, 2012: Ice Mountain in Hampshire County was named a National Natural Landmark by the U.S. Department of the Interior at a ceremony to mark the 50th anniversary of the program.

May 19, 1920: Ten people were killed in what became known as the Matewan Massacre. Baldwin-Felts detectives came to Matewan to evict striking miners and their families, but Police Chief Sid Hatfield tried to stop the evictions as being unauthorized by law.

May 20, 1949: Nick Joe Rahall II was born in Beckley. When Rahall entered Congress in 1977, he was its youngest member.

May 21, 1853: William M.O. Dawson was born in Bloomington, Maryland, just across the Potomac River from what is now the Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. He became the 12th governor of West Virginia.

May 22, 1947: Supreme Court Justice Margaret ‘‘Peggy’’ Workman was born in Charleston. In the election of November 1988, she became the first woman on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals and the first woman to be elected to statewide office in West Virginia.

e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council. For more information, contact the West Virginia Humanities Council, 1310 Kanawha Blvd. E., Charleston, WV 25301; (304) 346-8500; or visit e-WV at www.wvencyclopedia.org.

Pictured is a past reenactment of the Siege of Fort Randolph. Volunteers will offer a “History Walk” event today, May 15. The fort will be open from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. for visitors to tour the grounds with their family or small social groups.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2021/05/web1_DSC_0417201752615810681.jpgPictured is a past reenactment of the Siege of Fort Randolph. Volunteers will offer a “History Walk” event today, May 15. The fort will be open from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. for visitors to tour the grounds with their family or small social groups. OVP File Photo