Gallia grad to speak at USMC 244th Birthday Ball


Staff Report



Ron Wroblewski is currently serving as the President of Tri-State Chapter 949, Vietnam Veterans of America and the West Virginia Marine Corps Coordinating Council.

Ron Wroblewski is currently serving as the President of Tri-State Chapter 949, Vietnam Veterans of America and the West Virginia Marine Corps Coordinating Council.


Ron Wroblewski is a Gallipolis, Ohio resident born in Charleston, West Virginia, who graduated from Gallia Academy High School and is a Vietnam Combat Veteran having served as a field radio operator with the United States Marine Corps from mid 1963 to late 1969 (Vietnam 1965-1966).


OHIO VALLEY — Vietnam Veterans of America, Tri-State Chapter 949 announces its Chapter President Ron Wroblewski has been asked to speak at the United States Marine Corps 244th Birthday Ball in Point Pleasant, West Virginia.

During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress passes a resolution stating that “two Battalions of Marines be raised” for service as landing forces for the recently formed Continental Navy. The resolution, drafted by future U.S. President John Adams and adopted in Philadelphia, created the Continental Marines and is now observed as the birth date of the United States Marine Corps.

The day is mainly celebrated by personnel, veterans or other people related to the Marine Corps. Usually, it is marked with a Marine Corps Birthday Ball with a formal dinner, birthday cake and entertainment. These Birthday Balls take place all around the world on Nov. 10.

The Marine Corps League, Meigs-Gallia-Mason Detachment 1180, will present its 244th Birthday Ball on Nov. 9 at the American Legion Post 23 located at 100 Second Street, Point Pleasant. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. There is no charge for admission, however, a donation is expected.

Wroblewski is a Gallipolis, Ohio resident born in Charleston, West Virginia, who graduated from Gallia Academy High School and is a Vietnam Combat Veteran having served as a field radio operator with the United States Marine Corps from mid 1963 to late 1969 (Vietnam 1965-1966).

His 100% service connected disability hasn’t diminished his love for America or his desire to continue to give back to his country.

His accomplishments are many; as evidenced by being named a Hometown Hero but, perhaps, his most significant and most recent is his successful project of having a U.S. Naval ship named in honor of Hershel “Woody” Williams, West Virginia’s only living Medal of Honor recipient. It took 18 years of dedication to get the Navy to name the ship.

Wroblewski is currently serving as the President of Tri-State Chapter 949, Vietnam Veterans of America and the West Virginia Marine Corps Coordinating Council.

He is Past General Chairman of the Veterans Committee for Civic Improvement in Huntington, two-time Past Commander of VFW Post 1064, three-time Past Commandant of Huntington Detachment 340, Marine Corps League and an organizer of many events in Huntington and Charleston.

He is very active in the veterans’ community of the Tri-State area.

Last year, Wroblewski was the keynote speaker at National POW and MIA Recognition Day presented by Gallia Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 709 and Post 4464 of the Gallia Veterans of Foreign Wars.

“We are Americans and we should be very proud of that,” said Wroblewski at the event. “There was a report in Pakistan published in a newspaper of an offer of a reward for anyone who will kill an American, any American. So let’s just see what an American is so they know when they find one. An American is English, or French or Italian, Irish, German, Spanish, Russian or Greek. An American may be Canadian, Mexican, African, Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Australian, Iranian, Arab, Pakistani or Afghan. An American may also be Cherokee, Blackfoot, Navajo, Apache or one of the many other tribes known as Native Americans. An American is Christian, or he could be Jewish, Buddhist or Muslim. In fact, there are more Muslims in the US than there are in Afghanistan. The only difference is that in America they are free to worship the way they choose. An American is also free to believe in no religion. For that he must answer to God, not to the government or some armed thugs claiming to represent the government or God.”

Wroblewski said Americans were found in a prosperous land rooted in free enterprise and the Constitution that recognized the “God-given right” of the pursuit of happiness. Americans are generous and had assisted many countries struggling throughout history, he said.

“You can try to kill an American if you must. Hitler did…and every other bloodthirsty tyrant in the history of the world,” said Wroblewski last year. “But doing so, you’d just be killing yourself. Americans are not a particular people from a particular place. They are the embodiment of the human spirit of freedom. Everyone who holds that spirit, everywhere, is an American. Be proud America. You have just cause to be proud.”

Please contact Commandant Jim Doss 740-441-5638 or Patti Leib 740-591-8611 as soon as possible to RSVP to the USMC birthday ball.

Ron Wroblewski is currently serving as the President of Tri-State Chapter 949, Vietnam Veterans of America and the West Virginia Marine Corps Coordinating Council.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/11/web1_Ron-1.jpgRon Wroblewski is currently serving as the President of Tri-State Chapter 949, Vietnam Veterans of America and the West Virginia Marine Corps Coordinating Council.

Ron Wroblewski is a Gallipolis, Ohio resident born in Charleston, West Virginia, who graduated from Gallia Academy High School and is a Vietnam Combat Veteran having served as a field radio operator with the United States Marine Corps from mid 1963 to late 1969 (Vietnam 1965-1966).
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/11/web1_Ron-2.jpgRon Wroblewski is a Gallipolis, Ohio resident born in Charleston, West Virginia, who graduated from Gallia Academy High School and is a Vietnam Combat Veteran having served as a field radio operator with the United States Marine Corps from mid 1963 to late 1969 (Vietnam 1965-1966).

Staff Report