River on the rise


Latest crest predictions

By Beth Sergent - bsergent@aimmediamidwest.com



Fog rises above the Kanawha River just before it dumps into the Ohio this week near the Bartow Jones Bridge connecting Point Pleasant and Henderson.

Fog rises above the Kanawha River just before it dumps into the Ohio this week near the Bartow Jones Bridge connecting Point Pleasant and Henderson.


Beth Sergent | Register

OHIO VALLEY — After a week of rain, sunshine and seesawing river crest predictions, the Ohio River is once again expected to be near, or at flood stage, in several local areas this weekend.

The most current water level predictions along the Ohio River were predicting flood stage would be reached at the Belleville Locks and Dam, as well as at the Racine Locks and Dam in Meigs County, with significantly high water elsewhere in the area.

As of press time on Friday, river crest predictions along the Ohio River according to the National Weather Service, were as follows:

Belleville Locks and Dam, crest predicted at 37.1 feet on Saturday. This puts the water into a minor flooding stage with flood stage at 35 feet. At Belleville, at 34 feet, water begins to cover Ohio 124 at the mouth of Laucks Run, north of Portland; at 35 feet, Ohio 124 is flooded north of Stiversville Road, at Rock Run, at Wells Run to Smith Ridge to Dewitts Run, at Forked Run, at Curtis Hollow Road and between Long Bottom and Shade River. Ohio State Route 124 near the Washington and Meigs county line, also experiences flooding. The river will fall below flood stage by early Monday morning, according to the NWS.

Racine Locks and Dam, crest predicted at 42 feet on Saturday evening. Flood stage is 41 feet at Racine. The river will fall below flood stage by Sunday afternoon, according to the NWS. At 41 feet, Ohio 124 at Antiquity starts to flood. Areas of Ravenswood are flooded upstream from Racine Lock. With a crest near 42 feet, Ohio 124 at Minersville is flooded.

Pomeroy is estimated to crest on Saturday at 45.6 feet. Flood stage is 46 feet. In Pomeroy, at 42 feet, the low spot in the parking lot is flooded near the boat ramp. At 46 feet, the Pomeroy parking lots and the river amphitheater are flooded along the river. Main street starts to flood. Some secondary roads are flooded due to backwater.

At Point Pleasant, the crest is predicted at 39.8 feet early Sunday, barely below flood stage which is 40 feet. In Point Pleasant, if the water reaches 40 feet, low lying areas surrounding Point Pleasant and vicinity are flooded due to backwater. Also, the amphitheater lower pier at Riverfront Park is flooded and half way up the steps. Salt Creek Road, Hannan Trace Road, Huntington Road at Boggs Run Road and Mason Eighty Road start to flood.

At R.C. Byrd Locks and Dam at Gallipolis Ferry and Eureka, Ohio, the crest is predicted at 45.1 feet on Sunday, below the flood stage which is 50 feet. At RC Byrd, at 41 feet, the Spruce Street Chickamauga Creek bridge is closed due to flooding of low areas around the bridge. For reference, at 49 feet, sections of Route 7 in Ohio at Teens Run, Chickamauga Creek, Kyger Creek, Clay Chapel, Clay School and just above Route 218 start to flood. Also, sections of Route 2 in West Virginia at Jerry’s Run, the old Coast Guard Station and Glenwood start to flood.

As readers have seen (and read) this week, these river crest predictions, like the weather, are subject to change and Ohio Valley Publishing will continue to monitor any updates.

Information provided by the NWS.

Fog rises above the Kanawha River just before it dumps into the Ohio this week near the Bartow Jones Bridge connecting Point Pleasant and Henderson.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/02/web1_2.9-River.jpgFog rises above the Kanawha River just before it dumps into the Ohio this week near the Bartow Jones Bridge connecting Point Pleasant and Henderson. Beth Sergent | Register
Latest crest predictions

By Beth Sergent

bsergent@aimmediamidwest.com

Beth Sergent is editor of Ohio Valley Publishing.

Beth Sergent is editor of Ohio Valley Publishing.