How to survive, and learn, in winter: Free programs at local libraries


Free programs at local libraries

By Mindy Kearns - Special to the Register



Some animals add extra fat or blubber to maintain their heat during the cold. Pictured is Library Clerk Racheal Zerkle, right, as she helps Becky Miller, left, and Emma Northup, center, with a “blubber glove.” The glove, filled with lard, kept the girls’ hands warmer when placing them in a tub of ice water.

Some animals add extra fat or blubber to maintain their heat during the cold. Pictured is Library Clerk Racheal Zerkle, right, as she helps Becky Miller, left, and Emma Northup, center, with a “blubber glove.” The glove, filled with lard, kept the girls’ hands warmer when placing them in a tub of ice water.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Wahama High School student Abbie Lieving, pictured in front of the fireplace, prepares to read a book to the children attending the program “Animal Edition, I Survived: Winter,” at the New Haven Library on Friday. The event was hosted at each of the three county libraries, which also includes Point Pleasant and Mason. Library Clerk Sheila Roush is pictured at right, as she introduced the children to the program.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Children learned about how some animals adapt their color during the winter to blend in with the snow and keep predators away, led by Wahama student Mary Roush. The children are shown digging through the tub of cotton “snow” to find the white felt animals.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Wahama student Zachary Roush manned the migration station at the New Haven Library program. Children held up “V” shaped strips of paper in front of the fan to demonstrate how the birds do not have to flap their wings as hard against the wind when traveling in that shape.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

A makeshift “cave” provided children with an example of how some animals stay inside during the cold weather conditions to keep safe over the winter months.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Children colored and crafted their own winter spinner wheels to take home and remember the ways animals in the wild handle harsh winter conditions.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

It was brother helping brother at the New Haven Library program Friday, as older sibling Brennan Grate, left, helped Brantley Grate with a craft.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Word search puzzles and other activities were provided to children at a library program Friday at the county’s three locations, Point Pleasant, Mason and New Haven. Pictured is a scene from New Haven, as high school students help the children.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

A display of animal books was available to children attending an after school program at the New Haven Library Friday afternoon. The program, “Animal Edition, I Survived: Winter,” was held at each of the county libraries, also including Mason and Point Pleasant, as part of “Kids Connect.”


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

MASON — Migration, hibernation, adaptation.

Children learned these are the ways animals in the wild survive winter conditions when the Mason County Libraries presented the program, “Animal Edition, I Survived: Winter,” on Friday.

The event coincided with a three-hour early dismissal day in Mason County Schools, and provided elementary age students with an afternoon of learning and fun.

The program was a part of “Kids Connect” in the local libraries, which has encompassed everything from special events, like building gingerbread houses at Christmas, to learning experiences, summer reading and story hour. “Kids Connect” is funded with grant money provided by United Way of the River Cities.

The animal program was held at each county library location – Point Pleasant, Mason, and New Haven. At New Haven, three students from Wahama High School, Abbie Lieving, Mary Roush, and Zachary Roush, assisted in exchange for community service hours.

Children were first led to an area where Lieving read the book, “Do Frogs Drink Hot Chocolate, How Animals Keep Warm.” Following the book, the kids were invited to various stations for learning and activities.

The migration station, manned by Zachary Roush, told how birds fly long distances for many days to reach warmer climates. They travel in a “V” shape so they don’t have to flap their wings as hard against the wind, and even take turns being in the front. As a demonstration, the children held “V” shaped strips of paper up to a fan to see how the wind affected the paper.

The hibernation station, led by Library Clerk Racheal Zerkle, showed how certain animals add extra fat or blubber to their bodies to keep them warm. The children experimented by first placing a hand in a container of ice water. Next, they placed the hand into a “blubber glove” filled with lard to show how the extra fat kept their hand warmer when placing it back into the ice. Finally, they entered a makeshift “cave” to hunker down for the remainder of the cold weather.

The adaptation station was led by Mary Roush and told of how certain animals adapt their colors to remain hidden in the snow and from predators. The children searched for the white felt animals in the tub of cotton “snow.”

Games, puzzles, and coloring and crafting their own winter spinner wheels finished the afternoon. Library Clerk Sheila Roush presented each child with a new book, bookmark, and treat bag before leaving.

Other programs are being planned for future school early dismissal days, and will be announced on each library location’s Facebook page. For information on all library events and services, call the Point Pleasant library at 304-675-0894, New Haven library at 304-882-3252, and Mason library at 304-773-5580.

Some animals add extra fat or blubber to maintain their heat during the cold. Pictured is Library Clerk Racheal Zerkle, right, as she helps Becky Miller, left, and Emma Northup, center, with a “blubber glove.” The glove, filled with lard, kept the girls’ hands warmer when placing them in a tub of ice water.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-1-1.jpgSome animals add extra fat or blubber to maintain their heat during the cold. Pictured is Library Clerk Racheal Zerkle, right, as she helps Becky Miller, left, and Emma Northup, center, with a “blubber glove.” The glove, filled with lard, kept the girls’ hands warmer when placing them in a tub of ice water. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Wahama High School student Abbie Lieving, pictured in front of the fireplace, prepares to read a book to the children attending the program “Animal Edition, I Survived: Winter,” at the New Haven Library on Friday. The event was hosted at each of the three county libraries, which also includes Point Pleasant and Mason. Library Clerk Sheila Roush is pictured at right, as she introduced the children to the program.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-2-1.jpgWahama High School student Abbie Lieving, pictured in front of the fireplace, prepares to read a book to the children attending the program “Animal Edition, I Survived: Winter,” at the New Haven Library on Friday. The event was hosted at each of the three county libraries, which also includes Point Pleasant and Mason. Library Clerk Sheila Roush is pictured at right, as she introduced the children to the program. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Children learned about how some animals adapt their color during the winter to blend in with the snow and keep predators away, led by Wahama student Mary Roush. The children are shown digging through the tub of cotton “snow” to find the white felt animals.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-3-1.jpgChildren learned about how some animals adapt their color during the winter to blend in with the snow and keep predators away, led by Wahama student Mary Roush. The children are shown digging through the tub of cotton “snow” to find the white felt animals. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Wahama student Zachary Roush manned the migration station at the New Haven Library program. Children held up “V” shaped strips of paper in front of the fan to demonstrate how the birds do not have to flap their wings as hard against the wind when traveling in that shape.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-4-1.jpgWahama student Zachary Roush manned the migration station at the New Haven Library program. Children held up “V” shaped strips of paper in front of the fan to demonstrate how the birds do not have to flap their wings as hard against the wind when traveling in that shape. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

A makeshift “cave” provided children with an example of how some animals stay inside during the cold weather conditions to keep safe over the winter months.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-5-1.jpgA makeshift “cave” provided children with an example of how some animals stay inside during the cold weather conditions to keep safe over the winter months. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Children colored and crafted their own winter spinner wheels to take home and remember the ways animals in the wild handle harsh winter conditions.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-6-1.jpgChildren colored and crafted their own winter spinner wheels to take home and remember the ways animals in the wild handle harsh winter conditions. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

It was brother helping brother at the New Haven Library program Friday, as older sibling Brennan Grate, left, helped Brantley Grate with a craft.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-7-1.jpgIt was brother helping brother at the New Haven Library program Friday, as older sibling Brennan Grate, left, helped Brantley Grate with a craft. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

Word search puzzles and other activities were provided to children at a library program Friday at the county’s three locations, Point Pleasant, Mason and New Haven. Pictured is a scene from New Haven, as high school students help the children.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-8-1.jpgWord search puzzles and other activities were provided to children at a library program Friday at the county’s three locations, Point Pleasant, Mason and New Haven. Pictured is a scene from New Haven, as high school students help the children. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

A display of animal books was available to children attending an after school program at the New Haven Library Friday afternoon. The program, “Animal Edition, I Survived: Winter,” was held at each of the county libraries, also including Mason and Point Pleasant, as part of “Kids Connect.”
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_1.26-9-1.jpgA display of animal books was available to children attending an after school program at the New Haven Library Friday afternoon. The program, “Animal Edition, I Survived: Winter,” was held at each of the county libraries, also including Mason and Point Pleasant, as part of “Kids Connect.” Mindy Kearns | Courtesy
Free programs at local libraries

By Mindy Kearns

Special to the Register

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing, email her at mindykearns1@hotmail.com.

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing, email her at mindykearns1@hotmail.com.