Proposal to preserve history


Discussion at New Haven Council

By Mindy Kearns - Special to the Register



A photo of the former Virgil A. Lewis home in Mason.

A photo of the former Virgil A. Lewis home in Mason.


Mindy Kearns | Courtesy

NEW HAVEN — Support was sought by a local historian for the establishment of a countywide historic landmarks commission, when members of the New Haven Town Council recently met.

Historian Chris Rizer approached the council with the idea of a landmarks commission. He said the goal of the commission will be to protect the historic properties that remain within the county.

Rizer said the commission would be comprised of knowledgeable volunteers who would find and list the historic properties. Then, prior to any changes being made to those properties, owners would have to seek permission before changing or razing any buildings.

He said the most recent property torn down was the Virgil A. Lewis home in Mason. Rather than tearing down historic homes or buildings, the commission could point owners to restoration grants that could save them.

Rizer said he is working on bringing municipalities and the county together for the joint commission. The council members asked Rizer to keep them informed of his progress.

Recreation was discussed during the meeting. It was announced that the community center is now open daily from 8 a.m. to noon for walkers. Roller skating will begin Jan. 18, and will be held each Friday from 6 to 9 p.m.

It was also announced that one of three heating and cooling units at the center has been replaced. Grants and donations are being sought to replace the remaining two, with an estimate of $4,800. A $1,000 donation was recently received by the Fraternal Order of Eagles in Pomeroy.

Residents Ken Vickers and Harry Roush both had concerns regarding the ongoing town water project.

Vickers said dirt was taken from his property that he had paid to have brought in to fill a low place in his yard. Now that the project has gone across his property, his yard is already beginning to sink. Roush agreed, saying contractors are not filling in around the new water lines as promised in the project specifications, which called for various layers of sand, fill dirt, and finally top soil.

Mayor Greg Kaylor said he and council members will conduct a surprise inspection to check on how the areas are being filled.

Roush also had questions on the amounts the residents of Hartford are paying for New Haven to provide them with water, as well as if an updated maintenance agreement exists with the Town of Hartford, and if prevailing wage is being paid on the project.

In other action, the council:

Heard a presentation by Peter Jones of Muni-Link regarding the possibility of changing the utility billing software used by the town;

Agreed to rent a roller for one or two days, at $600 per day, when the town receives its ordered 25 tons of cold patch to fill potholes;

Heard a report from Police Chief Dave Hardwick that December included 143 service calls, 113 traffic stops, and six arrests;

Agreed to conduct the first reading of an updated farm animal ordinance at the next meeting, with fines being increased to $100 for the first offense, and a $100 increase for each subsequent offense after, plus a $72 court cost; and,

Set the next meeting for Jan. 22 at 6 p.m., due to the 21st being Martin Luther King. Jr. Day.

Attending were Mayor Kaylor, Recorder Roberta Hysell, and council members Roy Dale Grimm, George Gibbs, Matt Shell, Grant Hysell, and Steve Carpenter.

A photo of the former Virgil A. Lewis home in Mason.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2019/01/web1_unfitlewishouseiswhite.jpegA photo of the former Virgil A. Lewis home in Mason. Mindy Kearns | Courtesy
Discussion at New Haven Council

By Mindy Kearns

Special to the Register

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing, email her at mindykearns1@hotmail.com.

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing, email her at mindykearns1@hotmail.com.