A hometown winery


How to create ‘Our Sibling Rebelry’

By Erin Perkins - eperkins@aimmediamidwest.com



The wines for OSR Winery are made inside the winery.

The wines for OSR Winery are made inside the winery.


Pictured is OSR Winery Co-Owners Brent and Bryan Williamson behind the bar at the winery.


POINT PLEASANT — In a building that has been in their family for over 50 years, two brothers joined together to open a new business.

OSR (Our Sibling Rebelry) Winery opened this past spring in the old Mowrey’s Upholstery building near the Mason County fairgrounds.

Co-owner Bryan Williamson shared he and his brother Brent Williamson are natives of Point Pleasant and decided to bring something new to the city in which they grew up. Byran, who graduated from Marshall University with a degree in microbiology, has been making wine on his own for about six years.

OSR Winery offers a wide variety of wines, coming in an assortment of dry whites, dry reds, semi-dries/semi-sweets, sweets, and jalapenos. The blends of flavor for certain wines makes for a unique tasting experience.

The wines available are as follows: dry whites – Chardonnay and Buster; dry reds – Velvet Buddha, Lot 304, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Little Red Pecker; semi-dries/semi-sweets – Hillbilly Love Juice, Holly Berry, Moscato, Pumpkin, and Sweet Child O’Swine; sweets – Cotton Candy, Betty, Snow Cone, and Cherry Yum Yum; jalapenos – TNT and Eyes Glowed Red.

Bryan shared he and Brent will be closing the winery for a few weeks for a winter break, but will re-open on Friday, Jan. 25. In February, in honor of Valentine’s Day, they will be releasing two new wines part of a peach flavored series. One wine will be a sweet wine and the other will be a jalapeno wine.

All of the wine is made inside the winery, but the grapes for the wines are acquired from regional and national farmers in areas such as Northeast Ohio, Northwest Pennsylvania, and California. Bryan shared they even import grapes internationally from Chile and Australia.

Wine making is both a craft and an art commented Bryan. Once the juices are obtained, the juice must then be fermented. The juice has a natural sugar in it and a yeast culture is added to the juice so the yeast can “eat” that sugar. The yeast digests the sugar to live and that breakdown of the sugar is an ethanol (alcohol) with a CO2 production. This fermentation process takes about a month and afterward the wine is moved off the dead cells into a fresh container.

Bryan commented a lot of chemistry is involved with wine making. Making sure the PH and acid levels are correct as well as the sulfite content is correct is a very crucial part of the process. Also, sanitation is crucial, if those making wine are not working in a sterile fashion, the wine could become contaminated.

After the wine is moved into its fresh container, it can begin its clarification process, simply meaning the wine can age. As the yeast settles to the bottom of the container, the wine will become clear. The clarification process for different wines varies, red dry wines take the longest which is approximately a year. As a wine ages, it continues to get better commented Bryan.

After the clarification process, then sugar or other flavors can be added to the wine to make it into its desired flavor profile.

Bryan shared since the winery has opened the business has been steady with locals being a supportive lot. Also, the news of a winery being in Point Pleasant has started to spread to non-local wine connoisseurs, bringing in customers from around the state as well as Ohio.

In looking at future plans, Bryan would like to obtain a restaurant license to have more food availability options at the winery as well as possibly offering different drink options.

He would also like to establish a collaboration with close range Ohio wineries and breweries and create a wine/beer trail to help bring people through Point Pleasant.

The wines for OSR Winery are made inside the winery.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2018/12/web1_Winery1.jpgThe wines for OSR Winery are made inside the winery.

Pictured is OSR Winery Co-Owners Brent and Bryan Williamson behind the bar at the winery.
https://www.mydailyregister.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2018/12/web1_Winery2.jpgPictured is OSR Winery Co-Owners Brent and Bryan Williamson behind the bar at the winery.
How to create ‘Our Sibling Rebelry’

By Erin Perkins

eperkins@aimmediamidwest.com

Erin Perkins is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing. Reach her at (304) 675-1333, extension 1992.

Erin Perkins is a staff writer for Ohio Valley Publishing. Reach her at (304) 675-1333, extension 1992.