Hatching a (lesson) plan


Students hoping for spring chicks

By Mindy Kearns - Special to the Register



Fourth grade students in Shayla Blackshire’s class at New Haven Elementary will be spending the next 21 days monitoring incubators and watching the growth and development of eggs, until hopefully they hatch into chicks. Pictured with Sean Cullen of the West Virginia Department of Agriculture are, from left, Wyatt Harris, Phoebe Richardson, Emma Northup and Reagan Johnson.

Fourth grade students in Shayla Blackshire’s class at New Haven Elementary will be spending the next 21 days monitoring incubators and watching the growth and development of eggs, until hopefully they hatch into chicks. Pictured with Sean Cullen of the West Virginia Department of Agriculture are, from left, Wyatt Harris, Phoebe Richardson, Emma Northup and Reagan Johnson.


NEW HAVEN — Springtime is a season when new growth occurs.

It is flowers blooming, bees buzzing, and for the fourth grade class at New Haven Elementary School, hopefully chicks hatching.

The students in Shayla Blackshire’s class will be spending the next 21 days monitoring the life cycle of chicks. Incubators, donated by Sean and Kim Cullen and Delton and Brenda Huffman, were set up in the classroom.

To kick off the program, Sean Cullen of the West Virginia Department of Agriculture spoke to the students about the life cycle of the chick. He also explained the importance of poultry in the state.

The eggs filling the incubators are a mix of Golden Comets, White Leghorn, Araucanas, and Brahmas. Students will be monitoring the eggs daily.

The children will add water when needed, and make sure the temperature remains at an even 99.5 degrees. If all goes well, at the end of the 21 days, they will watch as the eggs hatch.

“This is a great hands-on activity for students to watch growth and development,” Blackshire said. “If conditions are right, the students will be rewarded with a chick.”

The teacher added food for the chicks once they hatch, as well as boxes for the students to carry them home, were donated by Southern States.

Fourth grade students in Shayla Blackshire’s class at New Haven Elementary will be spending the next 21 days monitoring incubators and watching the growth and development of eggs, until hopefully they hatch into chicks. Pictured with Sean Cullen of the West Virginia Department of Agriculture are, from left, Wyatt Harris, Phoebe Richardson, Emma Northup and Reagan Johnson.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/24/2017/03/web1_3.24-PPR-Chicks.jpgFourth grade students in Shayla Blackshire’s class at New Haven Elementary will be spending the next 21 days monitoring incubators and watching the growth and development of eggs, until hopefully they hatch into chicks. Pictured with Sean Cullen of the West Virginia Department of Agriculture are, from left, Wyatt Harris, Phoebe Richardson, Emma Northup and Reagan Johnson.
Students hoping for spring chicks

By Mindy Kearns

Special to the Register

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing who can be reached at mindykearns1@hotmail.com.

Mindy Kearns is a freelance writer for Ohio Valley Publishing who can be reached at mindykearns1@hotmail.com.